Tag Archives: The Eagles

3 songs

Commit to a Writing Process – A Challenge

Write about the three most important songs in your life — what do they mean to you? and
Today, try free writing. To begin, empty your mind onto the page. Don’t censor yourself; don’t think. Just let go. Let the emotions or memories connected to your three songs carry you.”

Three most important songs is easy.

PUT YOUR HEAD ON MY SHOULDER

When I was 13 and about to move from senior Public to High School we had a dance club at our school. It was called Club 78 and was held in our gymnasium at J.F. Carmichael Public School and was held once a month I think.

 Paul Anka 1959 – A Canadian boy who struck gold.

Now 13 is a strange age for kids.  Girls are often taller than boys.  A boy asked me to dance (which was a good thing back when girls lined up against one gymnasium wall and boys lined up against another.  I remember that dance and that I was tall enough that when we came together on the dance floor I could almost taste the Brylcreem (of the ‘little dab’ll do ya’ fame).

I don’t remember the boy – how I wish I did – but I remember the dance.

HOTEL CALIFORNIA 

When I lived in South Texas for two years this was a popular song sure to be played on every jukebox. At the time I found the red-neck attitude of many rather charming and working in Health Care different but rewarding.  Everyone had their own bar they went to after work. Doctors, lawyers, and judges gathered for a drink and hors d’oeuvres daily.  Never for a long time but it was a ritual.  

After the first year and a half constant sun, wind, bad tempered rattlers , scorpions and homesickness started to wear on me and whenever I heard this song I started to feel like a prisoner – ‘You can check out any time you  like./ But you can never leave. 

I knew it was time to return to the flora and fauna and family in Canada.

I AM WOMAN HEAR ME ROAR

Personally I am getting a little sick of the fight and plight of women.  The struggles are real but the constant in your face blah blah blah of it all is tiresome.  Having said that, Helen Reddy’s song released in 1972 strikes a chord of eternal strength.  Time,  and fashion has no effect on this song about wisdom, failing, overcoming, and strength.  Words like ‘you can bend but never break me,’  I know too much to go back an’ pretend,’ ‘And I come back even  stronger’.   No loud shouting or braying but soft and steely.  I stand a little straighter when I hear this song.