Tag Archives: education

Two Year Olds To Start School

 

Two Years Old?
You know sometimes I feel like a dinosaur.  Not the big purple dancing kind but the bones in the museum having left behind an oil field type.
It could be triggered by prepubescent fashion with excessive exposure of midriffs and upper thighs, or actions by our various Ministries in Government which more and more are resembling those wicked ones out of Harry Potter, or like today by idiots who do studies and then make recommendations that you just know those with power will embrace.
Now the interesting fact about studies is that they are often done to support a decision already made.  The ‘study’ is tailored to give a desired outcome.  That particular fact should not surprise anyone who breathes and understands words.
Last night’s broadcasts and today’s newspapers are giving a peek at what I figure is already a done deal.
Two year olds, our babies, should be in school and away from the control of parents and private care givers of choice.  Put our babies in the hands of the state.  It is assumed that all school staff are better equipped to raise our young
‘uns.
The next step I assume with my dinosaur spidey sense is that newborns will be wrenched from the delivery rooms and raised by the state.
Hmmm that is sounding more and more like the science fiction novels of the past were in fact more prophetic than imaginary.

http://news.nationalpost.com/2011/11/22/children-should-start-school-at-two-years-old-study/

AFRICA CLICKS Suzanne Stevens Guest Blog

As you know from my previous guest posts, Susanne and Michael are a couple who have taken a year out of their lives to follow a dream.   Mike is my nephew.  As they post on their own website suzannefstevens.com I will post their experiences here.  Enjoy!

Sandwiched Between Creating Possibilities

by Suzanne F. Stevens on April 24, 2011

Filed in: Suzanne’s Perspective

 

Leah Ngini & Suzanne F StevensLeah Ngini & Suzanne F Stevens in Maasia Courtyard at St. Christopher’s School

Often when people think of the Sub-Sahara, they conjure up images of starving children, slums, and corruption. Although these images are real, in many places they only tell part of a story. The story they tell is the part of a society that is broken. That is not the complete story of Africa. Africa’s story is also found in communities where families insist on educating boys and girls. Its story is found when parents ensure they educate themselves on nutrition. Its story is found where parents try to provide their children with the best opportunities for education, and it is found where a woman finds a man that supports her and her dreams.

To hear this story, you would need to know a woman such as Leah Ngini, Executive Director of St. Christopher’s School, and namesake of the newly developing Leah Ngini Community Centre at Africa International University, in Nairobi, Kenya.  Leah’s spirit is contagious. Her purpose is focused, and her vision is realized. This is the third time I have been to Kenya and on my last two visits I had the pleasure of visiting a couple slums and orphanages. I always left with a hole in my heart not because the kids were so bad off, but because in spite of their circumstances they smiled and played and welcomed you with open arms. While I visited St. Christopher’s my experience was completely different. First, there were no kids, due to spring holidays. Secondly, this was a school that would be envied in the West. They thought of everything when they built this place from small toilets for the little ones, to themed rooms, to Maasai (semi-nomadic people located in Kenya and northern Tanzania)and Eco-themed courtyards. It was a place to admire. The school was just finished in January 2011 after Leah had the opportunity to buy more land and extend it to include younger ages. She now educates kids from pre-school to Fourth Form.

I had the pleasure of listening to Leah speak in November in Toronto, Canada at a conference I was producing hosted by my foundation, Ignite Excellence, to raise funds for women leaders in Africa. To hear Leah speak of where she came from was truly inspiring. She was a storyteller that drew you in with every word. Leah is the third child of ten and is now in her sixties. At the time when Leah was born, it was not common for a mother to have ten children and for all of them to survive. When I met her mother, however, it was not hard to see, even at ninety-one, where Leah received her spirit and determination. Her mother ensured that her children were well-nourished and educated no matter what the cost.

I think if I asked Leah why she has been so successful, she would first credit her mother, for her dedication and fortitude. I think she would then speak of her late husband and of his commitment to her and their children. Then perhaps speak of her daughters and their insight and drive to keep their mother’s vision alive while ensuring the school operates at the highest standard.

Leah speaks of her husband with such fond memories and a glow in her eye when she admits that the school was her dream, but building it and expanding on it was realized only with his support.

Leah Ngini tells the story of the education, the obstacles, the opportunities and the possibilities she has experienced. She is part of a legacy of women who were committed to education.  Her grandmother ran away from her village so that she could go to school at a time when girls were not considered worth educating. Her mother made sure that Leah was able to go to school.  But even then, girls just went to school if they had nothing else to do, so it was no surprise that Leah became a teacher so that she could influence the next generation.

Leah seems to be a woman who was sandwiched between all that was good. The determination of a grandmother, the insight of a mother, the support of a husband and the pride of her children. Leah has a family business that focuses on educating the future children of Kenya. Leah would admit that she has a special place for education particularly amongst girls. Leah started a school where girls and boys studied together, and saw from the beginning that girls could do just as well as the boys, or better, and they did.  Today, St. Christopher Schools are visible around Nairobi, and their reputation for excellence is well known.

Daughters educated in law and accounting have proven to be quite an asset in the running of the family business. In meeting them both, you can see their spirit, insight and determination, and perhaps the most visible trait is their pride in their mother and their grandmother for being women that had a voice and an opinion and made sure people heard them.

This is the Africa I am coming to know: the one filled with possibilities and leaders that have a voice, and seem to use it with authority and grace.

Leah Ngini will be interview on wisdomexchangetv.com in July.  Leah’s interview will be located under business & education. She will tells a bit of her story, but more importantly the lessons she learned and the leadership lessons she suggests.

Visit www.wisdomexchangetv.com to hear women inspire us to stretch our vision of what we can do, and what WE can be. New interviews and Expert Perspective blogs will be updated regularly with the insights of the African women leaders of today for tomorrow.

Suzanne F Stevens
Chief Edge Optimizer
http://www.suzannefstevens.com
Nairobi, Kenya

 

 

AFRICA CLICKS Wisdom Exchange TV

Yesterday I posted on a couple traveling and working in Africa. Suzanne Stevens and her husband Michael Gingerich. Mike is my nephew.

. PLease note the correction to the foundation addy!

Their project is Wisdom Exchange TV and they are looking for subscribers to the site which is free.

I am posting their letter in it’s entirety below. Please enjoy, subscribe, and pass on!

Jumbo Chris

As you know my husband, Mike Gingerich, and I are travelling through Africa for the next year interviewing women leaders for Wisdom Exchange TV, amongst other philanthropic initiatives.

This is a pioneering initiative that not only are we excited about, but we believe will provide some fundamental leadership lessons for inspiring and already achieved women leaders.

Women are the change agents of Africa, and with higher education they can change many of the injustices that are done to women in the developing world.

We are asking you to subscribe to Wisdom Exchange TV and share the site with your friends. The subscription is FREE, and we will just inform you when a new episode is upload (by the way, this is quite the process in Kenya due to limited bandwidth).

The reason we are asking,

1. You will gain insight and perspective into Women from a huge continent.

2. You will also be assisting in helping us create awareness of the site, which will assist in gaining sponsorship for Africa Business Women Connected Summit taking place in Ethiopia in 2013 – promoting international trade.

The more people who subscribe, the more compelling to sponsors, the bigger impact we can make on women in Africa.

3. You will also help create awareness for the Ignite Excellence Foundation (www.igniteexcellencefoundation.org), where Mike and I are presently handing out three scholarships for under-graduates and post-graduates to invest in women leadership.

The belief is, the more women in leadership the more women will own land, be able to get passports, and will not be violated.

Please go to http://www.wisdomexchangetv.com and subscribe.

We appreciate your support and we look forward to hearing your updates on facebook, linked-in and via email.

Sincerely,

Suzanne F Stevens

Chief Edge Optimizer

Ignite Excellence Group of Initiatives

suzannefstevens@igniteexcellence.com

info@wisdomexchangetv.com

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