Category Archives: Poetry

We are having limerick fun!

JB made this Limerick Day over at AWA

This isn’t really National Limerick Day. Apparently that is May 12th. But Limericks are the fun topic of the day.

JB posted fun limericks by one of the authors’ of Murder is Everywhere, who allowed one of hers to be posted and also wrote a personal one for JB.

Now, how can I let that pass? So here is my effort!

It’s so much fun having JB back,

Her absence certainly caused a lack

Her interest now is not a trick

It’s all about The Limerick

And now I joined the poetic track!

Sort of. Not my best effort but so much fun!

Poetry Poetry Everywhere Poetry

Originally posted on AWA

Almost everything I read today

Was poetic and rhythmic 

It had that sway.

Some rhymed, some chimed,

Some not at all

But the words 

Had the power

To completely enthrall.

To take one’s mind 

From a dreary world

To soothe the soul

Of a weary girl.

Therein lies

The point of it all,

The beauty of words

The beauty of worlds.

A poet I will never be

But Your words

I read with a definite glee.

So from here

At North of 43

I say goodnight

Quite happily!!

I wish

I loved JB’s post yesterday.

You know the one with the game?

I really wish that I could play,

But cannot think of a single name.

The Seasons changed today,

My favourite time of year,

I really wish that I could play

But something else is very clear.

If wishes were horses

All Beggars would ride

If wishes came true

I could decide

To play the games,

Frolick in fall,

Make up names

And manage it all.

Sad to say I’m under the weather,

Happy to say not for long

My brain is more like a feather

Tomorrow, I am sure will be like a song!

So, from Bridgesburning I must bid you adieu, and wish you well

Can I say?

A weak attempt at correcting a near miss on mid night waking

I woke when I thought

The night was done.

Looked at the clock

It was only one.

What pulled me away?

What woke me up

What caused my thoughts

To stir the cup?

Can I say, perhaps

A brilliant thought?

Epiphany?

Alas, I cannot.

Simply stated

And for naught

The blogging fact

Is I forgot.

My day to blog

Though I am tired,

I got it in

Under the wire.

So, from North of 43

I once again

Go off to sleep

And to you send

ZZZZZZZZZs

I broke a mirror today

I broke a mirror today

A long pause

I just stood still

Considering

Oh. No. Surely not

Seven years

Bad Luck?

I’m Seventy-two

That won’t do

I won’t be fine

Until I am Seventy-nine?

And then

A thought

Perhaps a sign?

Events conspiring

Have changed my path

Relentlessly

These past days and weeks.

Yes, a sign

Things Have Ended

Yes, a sign

The Door Has Closed

Yes, a sign

A new and exciting future

A new and exciting path

Yes.

I Choose

As Judith says

I CHOOSE

ah

freedom

Sometimes what you need is right there….

Poems speak to one in many ways; rhythm, meaning, metaphor, reality.  They can be soft and soothing, or hard and brutal, warm or cold, nurturing or ball busting.

Joss Burnel, an expat living and writing in Cuenca, Equador, has written many a poetic word.

One in particular caught my eye yesterday and moved my spirit.

Now I can explain about my Thursday evening meetings with my international group of three,  in which every possible topic is discussed including what we are writing, and reading, and commenting on the world at large.  We started as bloggers six or seven years ago, then emailing, and now using Skype world wide.

Me in South Western, Ontario, Canada, Joss in Cuenca, Equador, and Judith Baxter in Wellington, New Zealand.

I am the one in the white robe stoically fighting a cold. (and if you think it did not take a considerable degree of bravery to post such a photo, you would be wrong.  I swear I do look better most days.  Honest..)  Judith is beside me and Joss above.

One of my favorite blogs Judith introduced me to Routine Matters who you can find here and who posted on Inklings.  Reading this will give you an idea about we three, but on a much different level.

OH! Back to the poem.  It perfectly reflects my thoughts this week and with Joss’ permission I present it to you now. (Highlighting is mine)

When you let go
of the fear,
the worry and
anxiety…

When you stop
the should,
didn’t, can’t
and sorry train…

When you accept
that what is
done is done,
what happened,
happened…

When you live
this day in
its entirety,
this moment
as the only
one that
matters – that
is real…

When you allow
your precious
self to be
fully human,
completely
still
and okay…

Then, the beauty
of today finds you
and brings you
to this
only moment…

Then your breath
is allowed
to be deep
and to resonate
with your
true heart…

Then, your
mind begins
to relax and
let go of terror…

Then, your
heart whispers
here is the truth
you are
seeking…

Then you know
that there is
life beyond the
worry and anxiety,
filled with beauty

and wisdom,
and that, truly,
all is well
and grace beyond
measure moves
you forward.

~Joss Burnel / 2012

A Poem for Mama Kat

Prompts:
 
1.) List 10 things you wish you could say to strangers who share unsolicited advice about your parenting skills.
2.) Write a poem inspired by a picture you took last week. Share both!
3.) Create a bucket list of 50 things you want to do this summer (with or without the kids!)
4.) A country you would like to visit.
5.) What is something you could stand to learn from your significant other?
 
2) Write a poem inspired by a pic you took.
 
A quiet night two boys sleeping
When the clouds gathered
Then two boys weeping.
 
Thunder shook the walls around
And one voice calling
Gramma, GRAMMA! sounds.
 
I flew down the hall with a plan,
Banish these fears
Make fun if I can.
 
Two boys one bed shaking, forlorn,
Fingers in ears pressed
Yea! I love a storm!
 
Storms are great said I above the noise
The angels are bowling
Don’t you love it boys?
 
Not so much it seems so I stayed
Telling stories fun,
About nature made.
 
The source of fear caused a blister
Not easy to calm
The source was Twister.
 
We huddled twice at midnight and two
Uncertain smiles now
As the storm still brewed.
 
Finally the storm abated,
The children asleep,
And still I waited
 
And watched in wonder two wee boys
Whose only call rang
In the midst of noise
 
GRAMMA!

and the thunder rolls

music

to

my

ears!

10 Facts about Getting Published in the Age of Reason

The Queen via Photobucket

Ten Facts about Getting Published in The Age of Reason
 
Today we look at the proliferation of books around us and wonder if in fact we will lose them eventually to ebooks. The ‘book’ has been part of our lives for so long it is difficult to imagine a time when they did not exist, easily accessed by all, but like everything else in there had to be a beginning. The beginning for the common folk of England came much later than in some other countries and was not welcomed by some.
 
According to Will and Ariel Durant in The Age of Reason Begins, Barnaby Rich wrote in 1600,”One of the great diseases of this age is the multitude of books that doth so overcharge the world that it is not able to digest the abundance of idle matter that is every day hatched and brought into the world.” A few years later in 1628 Robert Burton wrote, “Already we shall have a vast chaos and confusion of books; we are oppressed with them, our eyes ache with reading, our fingers with turning.”
 
According to Durant both these men were authors. The aristocracy had been reading for ages but books and the resultant plays available to a common class who were learning to read was new.
 
So a few facts of interest:
1). There were 250 publishers in Elizabethan England
2). Publishers also did their own printing, publishing and book selling
3) Authors were paid 5 pounds for a book.
4). Registering a publication with the Stationers Company constituted copyright not for the author, but for the publisher.
5). A few authors managed to live by their pen but most did not.
6). There were severe restrictions on what could be written (while the Queen apparently supported free thought she was absolutely against free speech, and many suffered the punishment, which was execution.
7). Smart authors dedicated their books to people in the aristocracy who then became their patrons.
8). Translations were published from books of Greece, Rome, Italy and France and this influence inspired writers of the day including Shakespeare, Marlowe, Webster and many others.
9). Poetry progressed from rhyme to classic meters and the aristocrats who at one time scorned poetry delved into the art. Everyone became a poet, good or otherwise. A craze for sonnets developed.
10). Naturally the keepers of the Morals, largely The church and the Crown were incensed for plays and writings glamorized incest, homosexuality, whoring, and got more than a few pot shots in against authorities, church and Puritans.
 
Christopher Marlowe according to Durant says, “He made blank verse a flexible and powerful speech. He saved the Elizabethan stage from classicists and Puritans…..Through Marlowe, Kyd, Lodge, Greene and Peele the way had been opened; the form, structure, style, and material of the Elizabethan drama had been prepared. Shakespeare was not a miracle, he was a fulfillment.”
 
Pretty exciting stuff I say!