Book One and 4/366

I just finished reading The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins.  Every year I think I should keep track of what and how many books I read because I read a lot so am naturally curious.  Anyway it is the first book finished this year.  I tend to be very cautious about new hot sellers.  Often the book doesn’t live up to the hype.

I read the reviews that said things like, GRIPPING, and I COULDN’T PUT IT DOWN.  I get most of my books from my library which I download onto my tablet.  Very convenient.  It means I don’t get to the actual library very often and I do miss that.  There is something magical about being amongst books.

I remember a few years ago, in Canterbury England going into an old old bookstore and smelling something so intriguing I never wanted to leave.  Sort of like old ink and dust.  So I miss the library itself.

Oh yeah, about the book – OUTSTANDING.  An amazing story filled with suspense.  Truly GRIPPING. All the reviews were dead on.  At least all that I read.

I just came back from visiting Auntie Fran.  She is not doing quite so well today but perhaps tomorrow will be better.  I think I told you yesterday a bit about my Uncle Jack who became her husband back in 1969.

Jack was this charming gad about and Frances was a traveling nurse.  In those days it was not unusual for nurses to travel the world, usually in groups, working for a year or  so in a part of a country then moving on.  There are ‘traveling nurses’ today but it is not quite the same thing.

Anyway Frannie and some nursing friends had saved some money in Australia and they decided it was time to travel.  They headed first for Europe, and worked in England.  After a year or so they headed off for Canada where they planned a few stops across country.

They went to work at St. Joseph’s Hospital in Toronto.  The girls shared apartments together and saved money toward the next leg of the trip.  Whilst there, (Fran being a well spoken Aussie often says things like ‘whilst’) a friend encouraged Fran to meet a male friend of hers.  Fran was rather rigid in standards and would not date just anyone.  She refused more than once to meet this gent.  Now as Fran tells it, one day this woman said, “I really think you should meet this fellow.  He is divorced, he is short and he stutters but I think you will like him.”

I guess that was the statement that sold her.  Perhaps curiosity.  Of course it was not an easy sell at all.  Which of course is part of the charm of their love story.  He truly had to woo her.

Well I must dash off.  More on our love birds tomorrow.

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14 thoughts on “Book One and 4/366”

  1. I love to keep track of my books. I’m certain it keeps me more consistent in my reading habits. I like to look back on the list of books I read ten years ago and it helps me remember what I was doing. It’s kind of a fun alternative journal.

  2. oh well, now I know this book is worth reading. I usually run the other way when “everyone” refers to a book as a “must read”. You, though, I trust. Of course, if I end up hating the book I am hunting you down! hee hee

  3. Before I buy a book I try to read the 5 star reviews and the 1 star reviews. The 1 star ones can be more truthful, as the 5 start reviews can be a set-up and not independent. However, as you ARE independent and gave it a great review, I will look out for this one.

  4. Love hearing about Aunt Fran and Uncle Jack (who I always called Aunt Jack and Uncle Fran somehow). Will never forget the giant stuffed monkey they brought back for me from Oz! I live a stone’s thow from St. Joe’s at the moment.

    Like you, I read voraciously. I am obsessed with a writer named Molly Gloss at the moment, and have just finished a four-book series of novels by an Italian woman named Elena Ferrante about growing up in Naples.

  5. I can´t wait to hear more about Fran. Haven´t read The Girl on the Train but heard good things about it. I´m not allowed to get any more new books until I read the ones I have! (my rule not someone else’s)

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